Preconstruction Meeting

08/27/15 at 04:24 PM | Published Under Remodeling by Deb Witte

Remodeling Your Home – Preconstruction Meeting

This meeting may be the first time that people who will do the physical work on your house visit the site.  Those attending may include the remodeler, the salesperson, the construction manager, lead carpenter, the trade contractors, any other staff members who will work on the project.

The preconstruction meeting provides an opportunity for you and your remodeler to discuss all the guidelines and rules for your project. The more information you each convey early on, the fewer misunderstandings and unfulfilled expectations you are likely to experience.  Thus, it is extremely helpful if all family members/homeowners are present to hear and understand all the various guidelines and tips (listed below) that may be discussed at the preconstruction meeting. 

Jobsite Etiquette:  Worker Guidelines

All visitors to the site (workers, managers, inspectors, and the homeowner(s)) need to follow jobsite guidelines. The following worker guidelines will help define your expectations and establish mutual cooperation between you and the remodeling crew.

Start and Stop Times. What times will workers begin and end work at your home?  Be sure to consider the neighbors as well as household members. Your remodeler may contact your neighbors and give them a phone number to call if they have a concern about your project. 

Parking.  Where can workers park near your jobsite?

Smoking.  Many professional remodeling companies prohibit employees from smoking on the jobsite.

Language. Most remodelers have policies that forbid profanity on the jobsite.  If you are especially sensitive to this issue, say so at the preconstruction meeting.

Radios.  Will you allow workers to play their radios at a reasonable volume?  When?

Change Order System. When you are “jumping off the plans,” or asking the remodeler to make changes in the plans, you need to understand the change order system, including paying for the change before work begins.  When a change disrupts the schedule, the change may extend the completion date.

Prevent Remodeling Fever. Now that you have a good idea of what you want, you need to anticipate and expect to feel a loss of control because of disrupted routines and the impact on your personal space.  The best approach is to:

  • Prepare well.
  • Remember the temporary nature of the disruption.
  • Focus on the progress being made. 
  • Always relay any communication from your carpenter, production manager, etc. expressed to you to other family members so there is no confusion or unmet expectations. 

Prepare for Inconvenience.  A remodeling project can turn your home and some days of your life upside down. For instance, you will sacrifice convenience during a kitchen remodeling project  However, a little ingenuity and some culinary shortcuts can lessen the impact. 

Designate a Safe Haven. Set aside a room in your home where you can escape from the chaos and commotion.